Nota nº 276

Discurso do Ministro Celso Amorim na 8ª Conferência de Revisão do TNP - Nova York, 3 de maio de 2010

03/05/2010 -

(A tradução em português segue após o texto em inglês)

Ambassador Cabactulan, President of the Review Conference,
Ambassador Sergio Duarte, Undersecretary-General for Disarmament Affairs
Ladies and Gentlemen,

Mr. President,

I wish to congratulate you for the chairmanship of this Conference. You can count on my delegation’s best cooperation.
The Non-Proliferation Treaty is an intrinsically unfair Treaty, which divides the world between “haves” and “have-nots”.
It is an expression of the imbalances of the international system. It is a product of an era in which  military might, especially nuclear weapons, were the main, if not the sole source, of prestige and political power.
The very unfortunate identification of the permanent members of the Security Council with the five nuclear weapon States recognized by the Treaty reinforces the perception that nuclear arms are a means to political prominence.
Unfair as it is, the NPT contains in Article VI the seed of its own self-correction. Failure to implement Article VI, however, perpetuates a destructive imbalance.
Forty years after the entry into force of the NPT, the fundamental goal of a world free of nuclear weapons remains little more than a mirage.
Brazil is convinced that the best guarantee for non-proliferation is the total elimination of nuclear weapons.
As long as some states possess nuclear arms, other states will be tempted to acquire or develop them.
We may deplore this perverse logic, but we cannot easily deny it.

Mr. President,

A decade ago, Brazil participated for the first time in a Review Conference.
Then as today, the Brazilian delegation had in mind that, in ratifying the Treaty, the Brazilian National Congress established the Government’s obligation to seek real progress in nuclear disarmament.
In the year 2000, negotiations with the nuclear weapon States, largely led by the New Agenda Coalition, resulted in a forward-looking and realistic programme of action, which came to be known as “the thirteen steps to disarmament”.
The Conference agreed, among other measures, on an unequivocal undertaking by the nuclear-weapon States to the total elimination of their nuclear arsenals.
It is sad to note that this and many other pledges remain unfulfilled.
Even as we continue to strive for the implementation of those steps, we must build upon the objectives of 2000 and move further.
This is precisely what the New Agenda Coalition envisaged in presenting a working paper with 22 recommendations on nuclear disarmament.
A clear commitment of no-first use by the possessor States would certainly add credibility to the Non-Proliferation Treaty.
So would legally binding security assurances to non-nuclear-weapon States.
Nuclear weapon States should also renounce the upgrading or development of new atomic devices.

Mr. President,

Last year, the United States and Russia committed themselves to a nuclear free world.
President Obama provided, in his Prague speech, fresh motivation for those who pursue the total elimination of nuclear arsenals.
The new START agreement added a necessary step in that direction, however limited.
Brazil welcomes conceptual advances in the US Nuclear Posture Review, mainly in relation to negative security assurances and in regard to the commitment by the US Government to seek ratification of the CTBT.
Just three weeks ago, in Washington, leaders from more than forty countries confirmed their willingness to engage in issues related to nuclear security.
But the Conference was also reminded, by more than one speaker, including President Lula, that the most effective way to reduce the risks of misuse of nuclear materials by non-state actors is the total and irreversible elimination of all nuclear arsenals.

Important as they may be, unilateral, episodic measures will not lead us to zero nuclear weapons.
Nuclear disarmament requires comprehensive and verifiable steps, as well as a precise and realistic timetable.
Arguments used to justify the possession of nuclear arms during the Cold War, if ever valid, can no longer be sustained.
Everyone agrees that the days of mutually assured destruction (MAD) are long gone. Paradoxically, the mindset of that era seems to linger on.
Nuclear weapons are of no use to address the security threats of the present day world.
They serve no purpose in combating transnational crime, preventing ethnic and religious conflicts, or curbing cyberwar and terrorism.
If anything, nuclear weapons diminish the security of all States, including of those who possess them.
A world in which the existence of nuclear weapons continues to be accepted is intrinsically insecure.
The risks of relying in command and control are well known to all those who have studied the Cold War.
They have been pointed out by experts, including persons who occupied high places in the hierarchy of nuclear commands.
Efforts to avoid nuclear proliferation should be conducted in all seriousness.
But containing the dissemination of human knowledge is an elusive, if not impossible, task.
It is the belief that nuclear weapons will be eliminated in a foreseeable future that offers us the ultimate guarantee against nuclear proliferation.
No country should be denied the right to peaceful nuclear activities as long as it complies with NPT and agreed IAEA requirements.
Legitimate concerns with non-proliferation must not hinder the exercise of the right to peaceful nuclear activities.
This does not diminish the importance of preventing violations and asserting that all NPT members fulfill their obligations.
Doubts about the implementation of the Treaty must, to the maximum extent possible, be dealt with through dialogue and negotiation.
We must not forget that the NPT is part of the overall goal of the international community to promote peace, in line with the principles and purposes of the UN Charter. 

Mr. President,

Ten years prior to acceding to the NPT, Brazil enshrined in its constitution the prohibition of nuclear activities for non-peaceful purposes.
Even before, Brazil and Argentina had engaged in an unprecedented confidence-building process, by implementing a comprehensive control and accounting system of nuclear materials.
It is our conviction that the Brazilian-Argentinian model of cooperation should be a source of inspiration for other countries and regions.
Brazil is also proud to be a Party to the Tlatelolco Treaty, which established the first nuclear-weapon-free zone in an inhabited part of the planet.
We are convinced that the establishment of nuclear-weapon-free zones, especially in regions with tensions, such as the Middle East, can contribute to peace and security.

Mr. President,

Any commitments additional to those prescribed in the NPT must be considered in the light of the Treaty’s overall implementation, particularly with regard to nuclear disarmament.
We are fully aware that disarming is a complex, expensive and long process.
But it is as much a political decision as the decision not to proliferate.
The world will only be a safe place when all countries feel that they are being treated with fairness and respect.
When their voices are heard and when the root causes of conflict, such as poverty and discrimination, are overcome.  
The presence of nuclear weapons only aggravates those problems. 
Nuclear weapons breed instability and insecurity.
They deepen the sense of injustice.
Let us not wait another five years to translate our shared goal of a nuclear-weapon-free world into concrete political action.

Thank you.

*************

Embaixador Cabactulan, Presidente da Conferência de Revisão,
Embaixador Sergio Duarte, Subsecretário-Geral para Assuntos de Desarmamento,
Senhoras e Senhores,

Senhor Presidente,

Gostaria de parabenizá-lo por presidir esta Conferência. O Senhor pode contar com toda a colaboração da minha delegação.
O Tratado de Não-Proliferação é intrinsecamente injusto, pois divide o mundo entre “os que têm” e os que “não têm”.
Ele é uma expressão dos desequilíbrios do sistema internacional. É o produto de uma era na qual o poderio militar, principalmente o das armas nucleares, era a principal, senão a única, fonte de prestígio e de poder político.
O próprio fato, lamentável, de que os membros permanentes do Conselho de Segurança são justamente os cinco Estados nucleares reconhecidos pelo Tratado reforça a percepção de que armas nucleares são um meio para obter proeminência política.
Por mais injusto que o Tratado seja, o TNP contém no Artigo VI a semente de sua própria auto-correção. No entanto, a inobservância do Artigo VI perpetua um desequilíbrio destrutivo.
Quarenta anos após a entrada em vigor do TNP, o objetivo fundamental de um mundo livre de armas nucleares continua sendo pouco mais do que uma miragem.
O Brasil está convencido de que a melhor garantia para a não-proliferação é a total eliminação das armas nucleares.
Enquanto alguns Estados possuírem armamentos nucleares, haverá outros tentados a adquiri-los ou desenvolvê-los.
Podemos lamentar esta lógica perversa, mas não podemos negá-la facilmente.

Senhor Presidente,

Há uma década, o Brasil participou, pela primeira vez, de uma Conferência de Revisão.
Naquela ocasião, assim como hoje, a delegação brasileira tinha consciência de que, ao ratificar o Tratado, o Congresso brasileiro estabelecia a obrigação do Governo de buscar progresso real na área de desarmamento nuclear.
No ano 2000, as negociações com os Estados detentores de armas nucleares, lideradas principalmente pela Coalizão da Nova Agenda, resultaram em um programa de ação prospectivo e realista, que passou a ser conhecido como “os treze passos para o desarmamento”.
Dentre outras medidas, a Conferência estabeleceu um compromisso inequívoco dos Estados detentores de armas nucleares com a total eliminação de seus arsenais nucleares.
É triste observar que esta e tantas outras promessas ainda não foram cumpridas.
Mesmo enquanto continuamos lutando pela implementação desses passos, é preciso avançar para além dos objetivos do ano 2000.
Isso é exatamente o que a Coalizão da Nova Agenda previu quando apresentou um documento com 22 recomendações na área de desarmamento nuclear.
Um compromisso claro, por parte dos Estados detentores, de não-primeiro uso de armas nucleares certamente daria mais credibilidade ao Tratado de Não-Proliferação.
Apresentar garantias de segurança juridicamente vinculantes aos Estados não-nucleares também.
Os Estados detentores de armas nucleares também deveriam renunciar ao aprimoramento ou desenvolvimento de novos artefatos nucleares.

Senhor Presidente,

No último ano, os Estados Unidos e a Rússia comprometeram-se com um mundo livre de armas nucleares.
O Presidente Obama, no seu discurso em Praga, deu nova motivação àqueles que buscam a total eliminação dos arsenais nucleares.
O novo Acordo START foi um passo necessário, ainda que limitado, nessa direção.
Para o Brasil, são bem-vindos os avanços conceituais contidos na Revisão da Postura Nuclear dos Estados Unidos, principalmente com relação a garantias negativas de segurança e ao compromisso do Governo dos Estados Unidos em buscar a ratificação do Tratado de Proibição Completa de Testes Nucleares (CTBT).
Há apenas três semanas, em Washington, líderes de mais de quarenta países confirmaram sua disposição de engajar-se em temas relativos à segurança nuclear.
Porém, os participantes da Conferência também foram lembrados, por mais de um palestrante, inclusive o Presidente Lula, de que a forma mais eficaz de reduzir os riscos de mau uso de materiais nucleares por agentes não-estatais é a eliminação total e irreversível de todos os arsenais nucleares.

Por mais que sejam importantes, medidas unilaterais e episódicas não nos levarão a eliminar as armas nucleares.
O desarmamento nuclear requer passos amplos e verificáveis, bem como um cronograma preciso e realista.
Os argumentos para justificar a posse de armas nucleares durante a Guerra Fria, se em algum momento foram válidos, não podem mais ser sustentados.
Todos concordam que os dias da destruição mútua assegurada [mutually assured destruction – MAD] há muito se foram. Paradoxalmente, a mentalidade daquela época parece perdurar.
Armas nucleares não têm utilidade contra as ameaças de segurança do mundo de hoje.
Não servem para combater os crimes transnacionais, para prevenir conflitos étnicos e religiosos, nem para reprimir a guerra cibernética ou o terrorismo.
As armas nucleares prejudicam a segurança de todos os Estados, inclusive daqueles que as possuem.
Um mundo em que a existência de armas nucleares continua a ser aceita é intrinsecamente inseguro.
Os riscos de confiar em sistemas de “comando e controle” são conhecidos de todos os que estudaram a Guerra Fria.
Foram apontados por especialistas, inclusive por pessoas que ocuparam cargos elevados nas hierarquias de comando nuclear.
Os esforços para evitar a proliferação nuclear devem ser conduzidos com absoluta seriedade.
No entanto, conter a disseminação do conhecimento humano é uma tarefa difícil, se não impossível.
A fé na eliminação das armas nucleares em um futuro próximo é o que nos oferece a garantia máxima contra a proliferação nuclear.

Não se deve negar o direito a atividades nucleares pacíficas a nenhum país, contanto que tal país aja de acordo com o TNP e com os requisitos da AIEA acordados.
As preocupações legítimas com a não-proliferação não devem impedir o exercício do direito a atividades nucleares pacíficas.
Isso não diminui a importância de prevenir violações e assegurar que todos os membros do TNP cumpram suas obrigações.
As eventuais dúvidas acerca da implementação do Tratado devem ser resolvidas, sempre que possível, por meio do diálogo e da negociação.
Não podemos esquecer que o TNP é parte do objetivo maior da comunidade internacional de promover a paz, conforme os princípios e os propósitos da Carta da ONU.

Senhor Presidente,

Dez anos antes de aderir ao TNP, o Brasil consagrou em sua Constituição a proibição de atividades nucleares para fins não-pacíficos.
Mesmo antes disso, o Brasil e a Argentina haviam-se engajado em um processo sem precedentes de construção de confiança, por meio da implementação de um sistema abrangente de controle e contabilidade de materiais nucleares.
Estamos convencidos de que o modelo brasileiro-argentino de cooperação deve ser uma fonte de inspiração para outros países e regiões.
O Brasil também se orgulha de ser parte do Tratado de Tlatelolco, que estabeleceu a primeira zona livre de armas nucleares em parte habitada do planeta.
Estamos convencidos de que o estabelecimento de zonas livres de armas nucleares, especialmente em regiões com focos de tensão, como o Oriente Médio, pode contribuir para a paz e a segurança.

Senhor Presidente,

Quaisquer compromissos adicionais àqueles estabelecidos no TNP devem ser considerados à luz da implementação geral do Tratado, particularmente no que diz respeito ao desarmamento nuclear.
Estamos inteiramente conscientes de que o desarmamento é um processo complexo, caro e demorado.
Porém, é uma decisão tão política quanto a decisão de não proliferar.
O mundo só estará a salvo quando todos os países considerarem que estão sendo tratados com eqüidade e respeito; quando suas vozes forem ouvidas e as causas dos conflitos, como a pobreza e a discriminação, forem superadas.
A presença de armas nucleares apenas agrava esses problemas.
As armas nucleares geram instabilidade e insegurança.
Aprofundam o sentido de injustiça.
Não esperemos mais cinco anos para traduzir nosso objetivo comum de um mundo sem armas nucleares em ações políticas concretas.

Obrigado.

Endereço: Palácio Itamaraty - Esplanada dos Ministérios - Bloco H -Brasília/DF - Brasil - CEP 70.170-900
Fale Conosco | Mapa do Site | Embaixadas | Consulados e Vice-Consulados | Delegações, Missões e Escritórios
Escritório de Representação: EREMINAS, ERENE, ERENOR, EREPAR, ERERIO, ERESC, ERESP, ERESUL
Legalização de documentos brasileiros: Setor de Legalização de Documentos e Rede Consular Estrangeira (SLRC). E-mail: slrc@itamaraty.gov.br